ISO Congress 2016 London

Programme for Thursday 7th July

 

 

0915   We visit Union Chapel, Islington, in north London. The organ was built by Henry Willis in 1877, III/37, with Barker lever, tracker and pneumatic actions; it was restored by Harrison & Harrison in 2013. The organ can still be blown by the original water engines, which we will see in operation. http://www.harrisonorgans.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/London-Union-Chapel-Specification.pdf

 
The Willis organ is concealed behind the stone screen
The Willis organ is concealed behind the stone screen
 
Thursday 7th July
Thursday 7th July

1100   ISO General Meeting 2.

1230  Lunch at Union Chapel and then travel to Bethnal Green in London’s East End.

1415   We visit the workshop of Mander Organs.

1615   Travel to Barbican, central London.

 

 

1715   St Giles Cripplegate, home of the Royal College of Organists’ Organ School.

The church’s three organs will be demonstrated and inspected, and there will be organ duets:

  1. The west gallery organ by N P Mander 1971, III/40, including 18th-century pipework.
  2. Mander Organs 2008, II/15.
  3. Kenneth Tickell 2009, II/5.

http://www.stgilescripplegate.com

The Mander Organ, 2008
The Mander Organ, 2008

We also expect to show you something very unusual:   a recreation of an early English organ, based on a remarkable wind chest discovered in Suffolk, dating from c1530, which provides crucial evidence for English organs of that time. The organ was re-created by Goetze & Gwynn in 2002: ISO members will have the opportunity to blow it.  http://www.goetzegwynn.co.uk/organ/the-wingfield-organ/ Dominic Gwynn will give a talk on the early English organ.

Early English Organ
Early English Organ

2000    Supper nearby before returning to the hotel.

Details are subject to change